The unique hull design pushes spray down and away, keeping you dry.

Aluvan 4.4 Katana Lite centre console

IT had been a little while between tests in an Aluvan, so I was keen to go for a run in the new 4.4 Katana Lite CC when the opportunity arose. I have always liked the various hull designs of the Aluvan boats, which have been developed after many years of innovation and product development.

The main reason I like the hulls, in particular the Pro-X, which is incorporated into the Katana Lite range, is because they work, especially in the rough conditions we often experience here in Australia. That sharp Pro-X entry literally cuts through the chop, providing a soft ride.

The wide beam is carried a long way forward and not only provides excellent stability when at rest and fishing but also ensures the spray from the fine entry is pushed down and away from the hull. Aiding the soft dry ride achieved by the previous features is the significant reverse chine that runs most of the length of the hull.

Combined, these features provide lift and stability, giving you a boat that is a pleasure to drive. Something else that aids in this boat’s ability to handle the chop is the 3mm bottom and 2mm sides. When combined with the extruded side decks, you end up with a boat that feels exactly how it is made: tough.

The hull weighs just over 300kg, which combined with the above features gives it a good presence on the water. Though rated to 60hp, the test boat was fitted with a 50hp four-stroke Suzuki and I think it was actually the right engine for the rig. On the test day I saw how it performed with two and three people on board, and the 50hp Suzuki did the job nicely.

You may get a bit more top end from a 60hp, but I’m positive most people would be very happy with the 50. This also means you can spend a few of the dollars you saved on the engine on other things. As mentioned, the test boat was the 4.4 version, which has a hull length of 4.4m and a healthy beam of 2.1m.

The Katana Lite is available in a variety of lengths, with the smallest in the range coming in at 4.2m and two larger models than the test vessel measuring 4.8m and 5.1m. The beauty of this is you have a few options when it comes to choosing a boat, and you can pick the one that ticks the most boxes for you.

All Katana Lite models are offered in either tiller steer, side or centre console, giving you the freedom to customise your boat, which is not always the case with smaller boats. Now you might be asking why this model is called ‘Lite’.
Well I asked the same question too.

The simple answer is it has a few less features than the Pro version. In saying that, you still get a massive number of standard inclusions, lifting it above a basic tinnie. One such standard inclusion is the front casting deck. This not only gives you a great vantage point to fish from but also provides handy storage in the way of a large front hatch and 86-litre unplumbed keeper well, which can also be used for general storage.

Just forward of the casting platform on the test boat was a generous anchor well and an optional bracket for your electric motor. Because this boat is designed for the keen lure or bait fisho, I’d recommend getting the bracket fitted.

The Aluvan Katana Lite’s standard DLX centre console has plenty of room on which to mount your electronics and gauges. A large shelf and massive glove box provide ample storage within easy reach. Something worth noting is even though the console is generous in size, the width of the beam becomes very evident with the amount of room available on each side of the console, allowing easy access from the helm to the front of the boat.

Also included as standard are side rails, a rear step and grab rail, transducer bracket, two long side pockets, a 30-litre live bait tank, rear cast deck with storage underneath for fuel and a battery… and the list goes on. Not a bad list for a 4.4m boat, especially when you consider it still has a full floor and maintains good freeboard.

Overall, this is a very well appointed boat that has all the features you need to hit the water, bar the addition of a few electronics.

A sharp entry and wide beam are key to delivering a soft ride.
A sharp entry and wide beam are key to delivering a soft ride.
Additional storage is located at the helm by way of a shelf and glove box. There is also room to mount decent size electronics.
Additional storage is located at the helm by way of a shelf and glove box. There is also room to mount decent size electronics.
The centre console is fitted with one pedestal seat. Infills also create a small rear casting deck and storage for fuel, a battery and live bait tank.
The centre console is fitted with one pedestal seat. Infills also create a small rear casting deck and storage for fuel, a battery and live bait tank.
Side pockets provide handy storage.
Side pockets provide handy storage.
The large front casting deck has good storage underneath.
The large front casting deck has good storage underneath.
There is plenty of room for fishing in the 4.4m boat.
There is plenty of room for fishing in the 4.4m boat.
Our test boat cost $21,900, which included the 50hp four-stroke Suzuki, Aluvan trailer, safety gear, electronics pack, electric motor bracket, Garmin GMI 20 instrument display and 12 months boat and trailer ergo. While not the cheapest 4.4m boat on the market, when you consider what is included I think it is definitely up there for value for money and ahead in terms of performance.

For more information on the range of Aluvan boats, give the guys at Motorsport Marine a call on 07 3888 0555 or drop in and see them at the Burpengary yard.

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About Ben Collins

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