Photo: coralbeach.com.au

Brush Up on Spearfishing Rules in the Noosa River

PEOPLE looking to enjoy a spot of spearfishing in the Noosa area are reminded to familiarise themselves with spearfishing rules around where they can and cannot spearfish.

Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol district officer Matthew Albiez said recently there had been an increase in the number of reports of illegal spearfishing in the mouth of the Noosa River.

“Officers conduct regular patrols of this area and those found spearfishing in closed waters are risking a maximum fine of $110,000,” he said.

Photo: coralbeach.com.au
Photo: coralbeach.com.au
“A number of offenders have been issued with infringement notices in the past because they were not familiar with the local restrictions.”

Spearfishing is prohibited in order to maintain safety and avoid potentially conflicting uses of the area, including boats entering while spearfishers are in the water. Possessing or using spears or spearguns is prohibited in Lake Weyba, the Noosa River and waterways joining the lake and river. This includes all waters downstream from a line crossing from Goat Island to Parkyns Jetty (near the entrance to Doonnella Lake) right to the mouth of the Noosa River.

The only place you can spear in the Noosa River is upstream of the line from Goat Island to Parkyns Jetty. It is also prohibited within 100m of the public jetties in or south of the Noosa River. There is signage notifying the public of the exclusion zones at select locations.

Spearfishing is prohibited in a number of other tidal areas and in all fresh waters. Spearfishers need to check for any closures when they go to a new area to fish.

For more information on Queensland fishing rules, visit www.fisheries.qld.gov.au, call 13 25 23 or download the free Qld Fishing app from Apple and Google app stores.

You can follow Fisheries Queensland on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (@FisheriesQld).

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